Hi, I'm Julia. This blog is my 'Neat Stuff' bookmarks folder.


Photoset

Sep 21, 2014
@ 11:16 pm
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Details from the Gates of Hell by Rodin..Bronze doors originally commissioned for a new museum in Paris which never opened. Rodin worked on the 200 separate elements for almost 37 years. Planned on the characters of Dante’s The Divine Comedy, the finished piece became a more abstract work with many of Rodin’s popular motifs included amongst the tortured souls

(Source: outerground, via seaghostsoaring)


Photoset

Sep 12, 2014
@ 7:43 pm
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euo:

[x]

I WNDHAHSHAHS RND

(Source: stanleykubricky, via seaghostsoaring)


Photoset

Sep 12, 2014
@ 5:22 am
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La Pointe Courte (dir. Agnès Varda - 1955)
Persona (dir. Ingmar Bergman - 1966)
Love and Death (dir. Woody Allen - 1975)
Mulholland Dr. (dir. David Lynch - 2001)

(Source: strangewood, via cinematografo)


Photoset

Sep 11, 2014
@ 6:57 am
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abbyjean:

Charts from OKCupid, showing how straight women and men rate each other based on ages. For women, the men they find most attractive are roughly their own age. For men, the women they find most attractive are roughly the same age - 20 to 23 - regardless of the age of the man. (538)

(via hellotailor)


Photoset

Aug 29, 2014
@ 10:29 pm
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

(via prufrocking)


Photo

Aug 29, 2014
@ 9:21 pm
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1,293 notes

strangewood:

Andrei Tarkovsky on the set of The Sacrifice.

strangewood:

Andrei Tarkovsky on the set of The Sacrifice.

(via cinematografo)


Photoset

Aug 25, 2014
@ 10:24 pm
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191,174 notes

tenaciousblink:

soon

(Source: 4th-dimensional-transition, via hellotailor)


Photo

Aug 23, 2014
@ 12:50 pm
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333 notes

dryingthebones:

This little mirror may not seem impressive, but for the people who adored them, they made a lovely scene even lovelier.
In the late 18th century, a Claude glass was used to look at beautiful scenery. To use the glass, you would come across a beautiful scene in nature and turn your back to it. You would open your Claude glass, framing “a picture, that if I could transmit it to you, & fix it in all the softness of its living colours. This is the sweetest scene I can yet discover in point of pastoral beauty.”
People in love with beauty would arm themselves with Claude glasses, tinted green, pink, blue or black to obscure and make the scene hazy and dream-like. Condensed into the tiny mirror, all subjects became the mythical realm of Shangri-la, a tiny spot of paradise to let your dreams take wing.
In the days before the camera, a Claude glass was the perfect and only way to capture and frame wild scenery.

dryingthebones:

This little mirror may not seem impressive, but for the people who adored them, they made a lovely scene even lovelier.

In the late 18th century, a Claude glass was used to look at beautiful scenery. To use the glass, you would come across a beautiful scene in nature and turn your back to it. You would open your Claude glass, framing “a picture, that if I could transmit it to you, & fix it in all the softness of its living colours. This is the sweetest scene I can yet discover in point of pastoral beauty.”

People in love with beauty would arm themselves with Claude glasses, tinted green, pink, blue or black to obscure and make the scene hazy and dream-like. Condensed into the tiny mirror, all subjects became the mythical realm of Shangri-la, a tiny spot of paradise to let your dreams take wing.

In the days before the camera, a Claude glass was the perfect and only way to capture and frame wild scenery.

(via seaghostsoaring)


Photo

Aug 22, 2014
@ 1:43 pm
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3,197 notes

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

(via zaclittle)


Photo

Aug 21, 2014
@ 3:01 pm
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166 notes

pingszoo:

Some progress and pushing around shapes and color

pingszoo:

Some progress and pushing around shapes and color