Hi, I'm Julia. This blog is my 'Neat Stuff' bookmarks folder.


Photoset

Aug 25, 2014
@ 10:24 pm
Permalink
181,568 notes

tenaciousblink:

soon

(Source: 4th-dimensional-transition, via hellotailor)


Photo

Aug 23, 2014
@ 12:50 pm
Permalink
332 notes

dryingthebones:

This little mirror may not seem impressive, but for the people who adored them, they made a lovely scene even lovelier.
In the late 18th century, a Claude glass was used to look at beautiful scenery. To use the glass, you would come across a beautiful scene in nature and turn your back to it. You would open your Claude glass, framing “a picture, that if I could transmit it to you, & fix it in all the softness of its living colours. This is the sweetest scene I can yet discover in point of pastoral beauty.”
People in love with beauty would arm themselves with Claude glasses, tinted green, pink, blue or black to obscure and make the scene hazy and dream-like. Condensed into the tiny mirror, all subjects became the mythical realm of Shangri-la, a tiny spot of paradise to let your dreams take wing.
In the days before the camera, a Claude glass was the perfect and only way to capture and frame wild scenery.

dryingthebones:

This little mirror may not seem impressive, but for the people who adored them, they made a lovely scene even lovelier.

In the late 18th century, a Claude glass was used to look at beautiful scenery. To use the glass, you would come across a beautiful scene in nature and turn your back to it. You would open your Claude glass, framing “a picture, that if I could transmit it to you, & fix it in all the softness of its living colours. This is the sweetest scene I can yet discover in point of pastoral beauty.”

People in love with beauty would arm themselves with Claude glasses, tinted green, pink, blue or black to obscure and make the scene hazy and dream-like. Condensed into the tiny mirror, all subjects became the mythical realm of Shangri-la, a tiny spot of paradise to let your dreams take wing.

In the days before the camera, a Claude glass was the perfect and only way to capture and frame wild scenery.

(via seaghostsoaring)


Photo

Aug 22, 2014
@ 1:43 pm
Permalink
2,961 notes

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

micdotcom:

The New Yorker’s Ferguson cover is one for the history books.

(via zaclittle)


Photo

Aug 21, 2014
@ 3:01 pm
Permalink
109 notes

pingszoo:

Some progress and pushing around shapes and color

pingszoo:

Some progress and pushing around shapes and color


Photo

Aug 20, 2014
@ 12:40 am
Permalink
1,789 notes

brazenswing:

Charles Pfahl Sunday Times

brazenswing:

Charles Pfahl Sunday Times

(via hellotailor)


Photoset

Aug 16, 2014
@ 5:42 pm
Permalink
208 notes

bedroominarles:

Hey y’all.

I am currently having some money troubles. Since graduating college in June, I’ve been unable to secure employment. Out of the 35+ jobs, four temp agencies, and one training workshop I’ve applied for in the last three months, I’m only gotten one interview. I have now applied for Income Assistance, but that isn’t a sure thing. I’m also unable to receive a loan or credit card limit change from the bank because I have no steady income.

I need to be able to afford rent, medication, phone bill, high-quality cat food, and groceries, as well as pay off my credit card.

Since I’m in such trouble, I’m opening up embroidery commissions again. I am quite good, for someone who doesn’t do it professionally, and I take great pride in what I make. I have a store on etsy (as well as a tumblr) that is stocked with a few things already, some of which are available for customization.

I would ideally like to charge:

  • $10 for anything under 3”
  • $20-25 for anything 4” or 5”
  • $25-$35 for anything 6” or 7”
  • Plus shipping, which could be between $5 - $11.

These are open for negotiation. Please message me if you need to have a price readjusted.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. Even if you can’t/don’t want to commission anything, signal boosting would mean a lot to me

My buddy Amara does incredible, delicate embroidery work. I commissioned a custom piece from her and it exceeded my wildest expectations.  (Also she is an absolute doll and her cats are adorable.)


Photo

Aug 13, 2014
@ 2:00 pm
Permalink
2,348 notes

fangirlside:

Anjelica Huston by Annie Leibovitz

fangirlside:

Anjelica Huston by Annie Leibovitz

(via hellotailor)


Photoset

Aug 11, 2014
@ 8:47 pm
Permalink
112,589 notes

fozmeadows:

imsirius:

Your character falls into the “friend zone” - Is this primarily a man’s problem, or are women put in the friend zone as well? x

DANIEL RADCLIFFE FOR ALL THE AWARDS

ALL OF THEM

(via rainbowrowell)


Quote

Aug 6, 2014
@ 2:18 pm
Permalink
8,905 notes

It’s hard for me to even remember the last time I was in a library.

[I]t’s impossible to see a world where we keep libraries open simply to pretend they still serve a purpose for which they no longer serve.

The End Of The Library | TechCrunch

Well, white dude with I’m guessing considerable stock in Google, is the library just there for your needs or purposes?

Maybe you enjoyed your exercise in wordplay and making points already made. But what was your point again? Books make libraries so without books libraries aren’t libraries? Books look different so libraries can’t be libraries? Libraries look different so libraries can’t be libraries? You don’t need libraries for books so we don’t need libraries? I’m sorry, what?

Oh but wait, we’re pretending? Pretending what? Pretending there’s an access divide? Pretending there’s a digital divide? Pretending information illiteracy? Pretending folks lack job skills? Pretending college students need help with citation (BAHA HAHAHAHAHHA)? Did I get a Masters in Pretending? I MEAN I DO HAVE A GREAT IMAGINATION SO I PROBS GOT STRAIGHT A’S. OR P’S FOR PRETENDING. I’m sorry, what?

(via yellowdecorations)

Also read this from BeerBrarian - The End of “The End of Libraries”

On Sunday, October 14th, yet another “End of Libraries” piece appeared. Per usual, it was written by a white male with no use for libraries, because every single time this trope appears, that’s part of the author’s demographic background. Beyond that, it’s a crucial part of the author’s background. It is overwhelmingly affluent white men who argue that because they do not use something, it has no value for anyone. Libraries. The Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program. Affordable health care. It’s the same argument.

(via thedanaash)

"The internet has replaced the importance of libraries as a repository for knowledge." Ah, yes, because you can trust everything you read on the internet.

Republicans play this game all the time. “I don’t need it, therefore it’s not important and we should get rid of it.” I can vividly remember the last time I was in a library. It was three weeks ago. I needed to do research and the material I needed was not online. Not every book is completely indexed in Google Books. And yes, an ebook is cheaper and faster than buying a physical copy of a book - but it’s harder to skim through an ebook quickly, and the physical copy at the library costs you nothing (up front; tax dollars etc etc).

Like I said, I was at the library three weeks ago. It was around 4 pm on a Tuesday. And you know what? It was CROWDED. There was a packed sign-up sheet for the computers. Kids and parents abounded in the children’s section. Older people and teenagers read at the tables in the main area. I had to wait in line to check out my book.

Before that, I had spent a lot of quality time on my library’s website. I like to read both physical books and ebooks. My library does Kindle loans. OK, their website is a crappy government website, and it can be a little difficult to navigate, but it’s doable. I read books I probably couldn’t or wouldn’t pay full price for, AKA a big part of the purpose of a library.

Libraries are not useless in the digital age, and even more importantly, they aren’t all empty. Just because YOU, PERSONALLY do not need or use something doesn’t make it a charming  but impractical relic of a long-forgotten age.

(via thebicker)

I work in a library. Here are some of the reasons people come to the library: 

  • They want directions. 

  • They want to collect food/garden/dog waste bags, all handed out free at libraries. 

  • They want to print/photocopy/scan. 

  • They want to access the internet, either on our computers or on their own, via the free wi-fi. 

  • Often this is because they have to apply for benefits, housing or jobs through the official system which is only available online. If they haven’t internet at home, the library offers free internet access. Where else does that? Sometimes they aren’t computer literate, so they appreciate an environment where they can ask for help. 

  • Maybe they’ll attend one of our free IT classes, ranging from the absolute basics to subjects such as Facebook, Office software, job hunting and how to use the Council’s Homesearch website. If they want something specific, such as how to use their own laptop or how to shop online, we can set up a one-to-one appointment, also for free. 

  • Our study spaces are very popular. Often they are all taken by ten past nine, after we open at nine. The number of people who have asked me how much it costs and looked surprised when I explained that using the library space is free and doesn’t require you to be a member surprises me. 

  • They want to read the newspapers or magazines the library buys (recently expanded with the launch of an emagazine service—I get to read SFX for free now, which is cool). 

  • They’re researching their family tree and want to take advantage of the library’s subscription to Ancestry. 

  • They want to consult the planning documents for a local development or the register of local voters. 

  • They want to participate in a council  consultation. 

  • They may have come to seek advice from an agency that operates a drop-in session at the library, such as the Citizens’ Advice Bureau or the police. 

  • They may be attending an event, either run by the library (an author talk, a book group, baby Rhymetime) or by an outside company who have rented the meeting rooms (theatre productions, ESOL classes, yoga). The library itself has regular events for babies, children, teenagers, adults, adults with mental health difficulties, adults learning English… 

  • We have regular class visits from the local schools. We read them a story and they all choose a book. Sometimes we go to them. It was actually really lovely to see how many children came into the library, talking excitedly about the Summer Reading Challenge we came and told them in Assembly. 

  • Children still look for books when they’re doing their homework, you know. Children who weren’t born at the time of the Millennium and have grown up with the internet. 

  • People actually still read books. Over thirty thousand items were issued in my library last month, and while we certainly have DVDs, Blu-Rays, CDs, Talking Books, Language  Courses, all those added together can’t be more than a couple of thousand.  

  • Free books. I’m sorry, I am never over how wondrous that is. Thousands of books, free to borrow and read. (And for those incapable of making the journey to the library, we have a Housebound service.) 

  • For all these reasons, we are really busy. Dozens of people join every day. Hundreds of people walk through the doors every day. Of course, there are people who don’t make use of libraries, who don’t need them. But really, someone who can’t remember the last time they went to the library can have no idea of the role they play. 

  • Libraries are not irrelevant. Libraries are not cultural artifacts. Libraries are living and changing, a resource and a social space, free at the point of access, engaging the community, offering a wide range of services, accessible to all. And what other institution can you say that about? Libraries are important. 

(via laurel-sea)

People go to the library for books. People go to the library for e-books. People go to the library for technology. People go to the library for human contact. People go to the library for educational and free programming for their children. People go to the library for fun. So learn your shit before opening your mouth. Maybe a librarian can point you in the way of the basics. (via inautumn-inkashmir)

Libraries for me mean a free climate controlled space, knitting patterns, and recipes. Also mine rents out DVDs and has a good sized selection of graphic novels, which really helps us keep our entertainment budget manageable. I only wish I lived within walking distance of mine, the library may be free but the bus sure isn’t.

(via fimbulvetr-is-coming)

Yeeeep. Libraries are still needed. I’m fortunate to live within walking distance of mine. I utilize it weekly. Last time I was there was Friday. I’d go there more often if the librarians weren’t horrible people. As it is, I do use the hold service on books I want and they travel from the one in Roseburg to my local one and I pick up the books and am gone. I think the library is the one place I go to the most out of everywhere.

(via herwitchiness)

And like, what about the fucking reference section? A library is basically the ONLY place you will find some of those books, unless you’re asble to afford to shell out 1000 dollars for a text. And a lot of information is ONLY in those books, or ONLY in books that exist only in physcal format, and are expensive/out of print. But there’s no way anybody could possibly want that information. RIght?

Like, the Dewey Decimal system books are still in copyright, so you only get the base information for it online, and thew books themselves are expensive as FUCK. The library was the only place I could ever find them.

(via heatherbat)

giddygirlgumption and I took our kids to the library literally 3 hours ago. And it was the second time we’d been in three days. My daughters have been going to this library since they were 9 months old and newborn respectively. They attended storytime, they’ve poured through the children’s section. In fact, there’s a little teddy bear that stands about 2 1/2 feet tall that is post upright with welcoming arms when you get to the children’s floor (the entire basement). My daughters have been attending this library since they were shorter than this bear and they now tower over it. In fact, the older girl volunteered there this summer. 

We’ve checked out music, dvds, books galore, done research and they’ve both learned the Scratch programming language in classes there. The library is part of our life, part of our normal. And we’re not alone when we go there.

(via brinconvenient)

Even if you think you can replace every single function of a library with something else, you shouldn’t. Why? Because a library is a place you can go, as an individual human being, and interact with other individual human beings, without feeling pressured to buy one single thing or spend one single cent (unless you have an overdue fine. Then you should really pay your fine). We have a rapidly dwindling number of those around.

(via widdershinsgirl)

(via bedroominarles)


Text

Aug 5, 2014
@ 4:35 pm
Permalink
119,929 notes

lipslikemarilyn:

orima-kazooie:

mister-smalls:

outerheavenuprising:

do you think like 600 years ago book nerds got real mad when the printing press was invented because filthy casuals could get books without having to copy them out themselves

Actually yes they did

and there were certain ancient Greeks who were angry when writing was invented, because it meant that literature was more accessible to the filthy casual masses

true shit, people

People never change do they

we got taller

(via probablywriting)